CLP01 – Vision in Motor Control & the Constraints-led Approach to Motor Learning w/ Rob Gray

My guest today is Dr. Rob Gray, the associate professor and program chair of human engineering at Arizona State University. He’s also the host of my favorite show, the Perception & Action Podcast.

In this episode we talk about the role of vision in motor control and how you can harness the power of the Constraints-led Approach to Motor Learning to improve your martial arts training.

This one is packed full of useful information. So if you’re excited to dive in, hit that subscribe button on your favorite podcatcher.

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How to contact Rob Gray…

Website: perceptionaction.com

Twitter: @ShakeyWaits

Instagram: facebook.com/perceptionactionpodcast/

Thank you so much for listening! If you have any feedback, you can email me at josh@combatlearning.com or send me a message on facebook.com/combatlearning.

Now real quick before I go — can I ask you a huge favor?

If you got value from this episode, leave us a review on iTunes, Google Podcasts, or your favor favorite podcasting platform. So many shows pop up and fizzle out, and we’re talking about stuff that almost nobody is talking about, so leaving us a review helps us a ton!

Thanks in advance, and I’ll see you on the next episode!

Produced by Micah Peacock

3 comments

  1. Mittwork…. I think a little error you’re making here is that Maittwork/Padwork isn’t really about reacting…sure some of it can be, but that can be replicated exactly on mitts…e.g. throwing an overhand right after oponent throws Jab….but often mitt work isn’t about reacting.

    1. Thanks for listening, Jim! Regarding mittwork, I have a skill acquisition PhD on a show releasing in a couple months who also thinks this is a problem too. Even if mittwork isn’t about reaction, combat sports *is* — so what are you training, and why are you isolating it from everything else? And even if it is just for replicating stuff you can’t safely train, you’re still getting the wrong stimulus regardless of if it’s meant for that or not. The human body doesn’t just do what your instructor wants it to.

      Talk soon!
      – Josh P.

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